Watch for insect damage and topdress your fields correctly!

Insect damage seen in Adams County, WI, on July 2.

Insect damage seen in Adams County, WI, on July 2.

Over the next couple weeks, it will be very important to keep an eye on your fields for insect damage and to topdress your fields with the correct recipe.

With the increase in temperatures, we need to keep a closer eye on our crops for insect damage. Yesterday one of our scouts, Bryan Decker, sent in some photos of some insect damage in northern Adams county.

Also with the constant flushing of the soil profile we are encouraging growers to evaluate fertility shortfalls in their crop ASAP. When the need is established, a liquid or dry fertilizer recipe should be developed and applied to the field as soon as possible. A lot of our corn is at or past the V6 stage, when the number of rows around is established. We want to make sure that our corn has all it needs at this critical stage. Also in preparation for the rapid growth phase, V8 to VT, the plant is going to be taking up a lot of nutrients. Our agronomists have done a lot of tissue testing this past week and a lot of the samples are showing some deficiencies. The major nutrient deficiencies are Nitrogen, Potassium, and Sulfur. Some micros that have shown up as low have been Zinc, Manganese, and Boron. If you are topdressing your corn please make sure you are putting together the appropriate recipe for your fields. Contact one of our agronomists to assist you in this process. Thanks and have a safe Fourth of July!

– Rob Shields, Agronomist

July Crop Update

Potatoes

Late blight has been found in a potato field west of Plainfield last Friday, 6/28. With late blight in the area it is important to step up your fungicide program by shortening intervals and using premium products. Be sure to be scouting shaded East borders as they remain wetter later in the day and are therefore at a higher risk of infection by late blight especially if you are spraying by air only. This week we are fighting 3rd and 4th instar Colorado potato beetle larvae who survived earlier insecticide applications especially on edges.

Corn

In corn, we are making sure that the fields are weed free and continue monitoring for foliar diseases and insects. Our black light trap moth counts have remained low for most corn insects. We are seeing quite a few rose chafer beetles in several fields in the area, yet we are not seeing much feeding from them at all but will continue to monitor them.

Soybeans

In soybeans, we are cleaning up weeds across most of the area this week and monitoring fields for early insects and disease.

– Otto Oemig, Agronomist

Armyworm damage found today! Watch your fields!

Armyworms found today north of Adams near Coloma. Please check your fields for this pest, they will move FAST with this heat. Let us know if you need any help checking your fields. If you are seeing more than 8% damage I would encourage you to spray an insecticide such as Arctic at 6 oz per acre ASAP. Contact us for more details!

– Rob Shields, Agronomist

Army worm damage #2  6-25-13

Army worm feeding 6-25-13

Stressed, stunted, and uneven corn found throughout our trade area…

Yesterday, I looked at some fields near our Melrose and Galesville locations and saw patterns of stressed, stunted, and uneven corn. These patterns have been seen all across our trade area, especially in medium to fine textured soils. It appears these patterns have shown up in our fields for a number of reasons. The primary culprit is the weather conditions we have gone through. The pounding rains have helped to compact these soils and reduce or eliminate the amount of oxygen present in the profile. Combine this with cool, cloudy and wet conditions and you can see the results. Areas of the field that have tighter soils from either the type of soil present or traffic patterns show the stunted symptoms much easier. If you can cultivate, that would help break up these tight soils and allow some air movement to occur. If cultivation is not an option, please try to reduce the stress on the plant wherever possible by keeping the field weed free (use a residual herbicide whenever possible); maintaining adequate fertility (confirm with tissue analysis); reducing the possibility of diseases (consider a foliar fungicide); and monitoring nematode pressure. Please let us know if you diagnose any issues you are seeing in your fields.

Stunted corn near Galesville.

Stunted corn near Galesville.

Stunted corn near Melrose.

Stunted corn near Melrose.

Stunted corn near Melrose.

Stunted corn near Melrose.

– Rob Shields, Agronomist

Insects attacking our alfalfa fields!

We scouted a lot of our producers’ alfalfa fields today. Second crop is well on its way and we are finding some insect pests. The potato leafhopper is one of the most damaging pest to alfalfa in Wisconsin. I looked at a number of fields today that will need to get treated very soon to take care of this troublesome pest. Also with first crop off, now is a very good time to topdress second crop with a mixture of Potash, K-Mag and Boron. Please get a hold of us for a recipe that will best fit your fields.

Potato Leafhoppers found today.

Potato Leafhoppers found today.

Rob Shields scouting alfalfa.

Rob Shields scouting alfalfa.

– Rob Shields, Agronomist

More wet weather this week (June 10-14)

More wet weather ahead in the forecast makes for tough hay drying weather, and more rain is the last thing we need on some of the wetter ground that we have been waiting to plant all season long. Also, this cool wet weather favors pythium in the soybeans and we have been finding some dead seedlings in several fields across the area.

In the potatoes, the second hilling is getting finished up and fields should be checked for weed escapes. Also, Colorado potato beetles are laying eggs in full force, expect the first generation of larvae to emerge next week. The black light traps are extremely quiet right now with only a few cutworm moths.

Looking forward into the future, consider doing some nematode testing on your farm this year. Nematodes are microscopic worms that exist in almost all soils and, while many are harmless or even beneficial, there are several plant parasitic nematodes that may be secretly robbing yield year after year. Many of you are probably familiar with soybean cyst nematode, but there are many other nematodes that affect other crops. Nematodes that are particularly damaging in corn are dagger, lance, root lesion, and needle.

At Pest Pros, a division of Allied Cooperative, we sample and test soils for nematodes to measure a fields relative risk for nematodes in the future. Such information can help you identify and begin to manage a nematode problem. Sampling can also help you asses your Poncho/Votivo and Avicta programs. For more information on nematode testing, contact the Pest Pros lab at (715) 335-4046.

– Otto Oemig, Agronomist

Watch out for pests in corn and potatoes this week (May 27-31)

This week we have soybeans emerging, and we’re on the lookout for black cutworms in the corn. In potatoes, it is mostly weed scouting at this point, but we are finding first generation adult Colorado potato beetles. Also, some of the severe weather has left some crops with wind damage, especially the newly emerged soybeans.

– Otto Oemig, Agronomist