Rose chafer beetle damage found in corn field today

Rose Chafers 6-24-13

Rose chafer beetles found north of Adams, WI.

Be on the lookout!  Today, agronomist and field scout Matt Selenske found some rose chafer beetles feeding on some field corn, just north of Adams.

– Rob Shields, Agronomist

Advertisements

Choosing the right fertigation recipe

Irrigation at BG 6-21-13 #2A lot of our irrigated fields are now receiving crop nutrients through the center pivot irrigation systems. Selecting the correct recipe is determined by many factors, crop present, yield goals, and plant tissue analysis. Pulling the tissue sample 3 to 4 days prior to fertigation is critical. This way the recipe can better reflect what the plants actually need at that stage. You can apply many things through your center pivots, such as Macro Nutrients (N, P, K), Secondary Nutrients (Ca, S), Micro-Nutrients (B, Mn, Zn, Cu, Fe) and plant hormones. Another option you can look at when fertigating is some of the products from Stoller. Two in particular to consider would be Bioforage and Stimulate. When you have shallow-rooted or poor root systems in general, an approved application of these two products can encourage a more aggressive root system. Please contact one of the agronomists at Allied Cooperative for further information on a recipe that is appropriate for your crop.

– Rob Shields, Agronomist

Stressed, stunted, and uneven corn found throughout our trade area…

Yesterday, I looked at some fields near our Melrose and Galesville locations and saw patterns of stressed, stunted, and uneven corn. These patterns have been seen all across our trade area, especially in medium to fine textured soils. It appears these patterns have shown up in our fields for a number of reasons. The primary culprit is the weather conditions we have gone through. The pounding rains have helped to compact these soils and reduce or eliminate the amount of oxygen present in the profile. Combine this with cool, cloudy and wet conditions and you can see the results. Areas of the field that have tighter soils from either the type of soil present or traffic patterns show the stunted symptoms much easier. If you can cultivate, that would help break up these tight soils and allow some air movement to occur. If cultivation is not an option, please try to reduce the stress on the plant wherever possible by keeping the field weed free (use a residual herbicide whenever possible); maintaining adequate fertility (confirm with tissue analysis); reducing the possibility of diseases (consider a foliar fungicide); and monitoring nematode pressure. Please let us know if you diagnose any issues you are seeing in your fields.

Stunted corn near Galesville.

Stunted corn near Galesville.

Stunted corn near Melrose.

Stunted corn near Melrose.

Stunted corn near Melrose.

Stunted corn near Melrose.

– Rob Shields, Agronomist

Insects attacking our alfalfa fields!

We scouted a lot of our producers’ alfalfa fields today. Second crop is well on its way and we are finding some insect pests. The potato leafhopper is one of the most damaging pest to alfalfa in Wisconsin. I looked at a number of fields today that will need to get treated very soon to take care of this troublesome pest. Also with first crop off, now is a very good time to topdress second crop with a mixture of Potash, K-Mag and Boron. Please get a hold of us for a recipe that will best fit your fields.

Potato Leafhoppers found today.

Potato Leafhoppers found today.

Rob Shields scouting alfalfa.

Rob Shields scouting alfalfa.

– Rob Shields, Agronomist

Crop Management Field Day sponsored by Allied Cooperative

Joe Lauer speaks at the Galesville UWEX event.

Joe Lauer speaks at the Galesville UWEX event.

This past Wednesday, June 12th, Allied Cooperative sponsored the Crop Management Field Day at the Ron Weltzein Farm, just south of Galesville, WI. UW specialists went over many important topics, such as insurance issues with prevent plant, selecting the right maturity for your corn, soybean considerations, herbicide issues, fertility management, and insect control options. In attendance from Allied Cooperative were local sales agronomist Nathan Ausen, agronomist Rob Shields, and intern O’Bryan Decker.

– Rob Shields, Agronomist

The sun is out! (For now…)

The sun finally made an appearance today, but it is hard to find dry areas to plant – lots of areas are still too wet. I was able to get into some fields in our western region, though, as our agronomy team worked hard to get things fertilized and planted before it rains again. Check out today’s photos below!

Jordan Olsen spreading urea near Bangor, WI.

Jordan Olsen spreading urea near Bangor, WI.

Jordan getting filled up with fertilizer, trying to get as much spread as possible before the next rain.

Jordan getting filled up with fertilizer, trying to get as much spread as possible before the next rain.

Planting corn for Mlsna Dairy.

Planting corn for Mlsna Dairy.

At Mlsna Dairy -- off the the field!

At Mlsna Dairy — off the the field!

Planting corn.

Planting corn.

– Rob Shields, Agronomist