The sun is out! (For now…)

The sun finally made an appearance today, but it is hard to find dry areas to plant – lots of areas are still too wet. I was able to get into some fields in our western region, though, as our agronomy team worked hard to get things fertilized and planted before it rains again. Check out today’s photos below!

Jordan Olsen spreading urea near Bangor, WI.

Jordan Olsen spreading urea near Bangor, WI.

Jordan getting filled up with fertilizer, trying to get as much spread as possible before the next rain.

Jordan getting filled up with fertilizer, trying to get as much spread as possible before the next rain.

Planting corn for Mlsna Dairy.

Planting corn for Mlsna Dairy.

At Mlsna Dairy -- off the the field!

At Mlsna Dairy — off the the field!

Planting corn.

Planting corn.

– Rob Shields, Agronomist

Advertisements

Headline® Fungicide On Alfalfa

Average total stem counts for sites treated with Headline were 31% higher than untreated sites.

Average total stem counts for sites treated with Headline® were 31% higher than untreated sites.

With the cold, wet spring and summer we are having, it is the perfect time to spray Headline® fungicide on your alfalfa. Headline is a fast acting, broad spectrum fungicide that delivers a high level of activity on more than 50 major diseases that can threaten yield and crop quality. We have seen tremendous yield increases over the past couple years using Headline; we also see higher quality feed as well.

Untreated plants vs. plants treated with Headline® fungicide.

Untreated plants vs. plants treated with Headline® fungicide.

Not only does Headline provide excellent disease control, it actually promotes improved plant health.

The unique chemistry of Headline enables more efficient nutrient uptake, more robust plant growth, and better stress tolerance to heat, hail, wind, and drought. Ultimately, this means healthier plants and higher yield potential.

Growers who have used Headline on their alfalfa report far less disease, more vigorous plant growth, higher stress tolerance, better standability, and, of course, higher yield — helping reduce losses and improve ROI.

044To be more efficient you can also run Ascend, Micros, and your insecticide for leafhoppers, Alfalfa weevils, etc., at the same time, greatly improving the health and yield of your high dollar alfalfa field.

To learn more about the benefits of using Headline fungicide on your alfalfa fields, call any of the Agronomy locations of Allied Cooperative and talk to one of our agronomists soon.

Thank you,

Izaak Rathke, Sales Manager

More wet weather this week (June 10-14)

More wet weather ahead in the forecast makes for tough hay drying weather, and more rain is the last thing we need on some of the wetter ground that we have been waiting to plant all season long. Also, this cool wet weather favors pythium in the soybeans and we have been finding some dead seedlings in several fields across the area.

In the potatoes, the second hilling is getting finished up and fields should be checked for weed escapes. Also, Colorado potato beetles are laying eggs in full force, expect the first generation of larvae to emerge next week. The black light traps are extremely quiet right now with only a few cutworm moths.

Looking forward into the future, consider doing some nematode testing on your farm this year. Nematodes are microscopic worms that exist in almost all soils and, while many are harmless or even beneficial, there are several plant parasitic nematodes that may be secretly robbing yield year after year. Many of you are probably familiar with soybean cyst nematode, but there are many other nematodes that affect other crops. Nematodes that are particularly damaging in corn are dagger, lance, root lesion, and needle.

At Pest Pros, a division of Allied Cooperative, we sample and test soils for nematodes to measure a fields relative risk for nematodes in the future. Such information can help you identify and begin to manage a nematode problem. Sampling can also help you asses your Poncho/Votivo and Avicta programs. For more information on nematode testing, contact the Pest Pros lab at (715) 335-4046.

– Otto Oemig, Agronomist

Plant Tissue Sampling

Of the many factors affecting crop quality and yield, fertility is one of the most important. It is fortunate that producers can control fertility by managing the plant’s nutritional status. Nutrient status is an unseen factor in plant growth, except when deficiencies become so severe that visual symptoms appear on the plant itself. By this time you have already cost yourself yield potential and all you can do is play catch up. By tissue sampling your crops during the growing stages of the plant’s life, you can get the nutrient status at the time of sampling showing you specific nutrient deficiencies in time to correct them and save your high end yield potential. Let the agronomists at Allied Cooperative help you protect your investment by regularly tissue sampling your crops and making the correct recommendations to help ensure a high quality, high yield crop for 2013. You can contact any of Allied Cooperative’s agronomists if you are interested in having tissue sampling done.

– Izaak Rathke, Sales Manager

Contact one of our agronomists to set up a plant tissue sampling.

Contact one of our agronomists to set up a plant tissue sampling.

Our summer agronomy intern, Alana Voss, taking a plant tissue sample.

Our summer agronomy intern, Alana Voss, taking a plant tissue sample.

Our summer agronomy intern, Alana Voss, taking a plant tissue sample.

Our summer agronomy intern, Alana Voss, taking a plant tissue sample.

On Demand Soybean System

Gerry Fanta and Sally Turpin are seen here treating bulk soybeans with our new On Demand soybean system! This year more than any other it is CRITICAL to have fungicide on your soybean seed. With the wet conditions in the fields, seedling rot diseases are going to be a constant threat this season.

The treated soybeans being loaded on our Bulk Seed Tender.

The treated soybeans being loaded on our Bulk Seed Tender.

– Rob Shields, Agronomist

Adams Agronomy hard at work…

With the sun out today, the Adams Agronomy staff were in full swing! Here are some shots of a few of our guys at work in the field. (Click images to enlarge.)

Derek Leckwee spraying.

Derek Leckwee spraying.

Derek Leckwee spraying.

Derek Leckwee spraying.

Shannon & Eddie working on his dry spinner machine.

Shannon & Eddie working on his dry spinner machine.

 

Doug spreading potatoes.

Spreading potatoes.

Harold Barr's machine getting filled up.

Harold Barr’s machine getting filled up.

Harold Barr spreading seed corn.

Harold Barr spreading seed corn.

– Rob Shields, Agronomist

Dealing with wet fields, weeds, and pests this week (June 3-7)

This week is shaping up to be a wet one which is a problem for some of the fields that are weedy and too wet for us to get into to spray. Consider increasing rates, and heating up your tank mixes for better weed control on taller weeds when you do get into these fields later. Continue to be vigilant in looking for black cutworm clipping of corn.  The threshold is 3% of plants clipped to warrant a spray. In the potatoes, the first generation Colorado beetles are laying eggs so look for newly hatched larvae next week. Do stem and stand counts this week to determine populations, and weed scouting to see if the hilling operation missed any weeds. Watch out for common ragweed especially as they are very difficult to control if they get larger than 2 inches.

Colorado potato beetle

Colorado potato beetle

Common ragweed

Common ragweed

– Otto Oemig, Agronomist