A USDA Plantings and Stocks Report Quick Hitter

The USDA released their plantings and stocks report this morning. Corn stocks are below average trade guess. Bean stocks are also below guesses. Acres are higher for corn. What? Really? Maybe they did this just to tell us they will resurvey. Also, these numbers are from June 1st. You and I both know things have changed since then. Bean acres are higher also. This I can believe.

Producers should be aware of the inverse that is hitting the corn and bean markets. This simply means that the market is not paying you to store your crop. So if you’re still holding old crop bushels, it is certainly time to think about moving some. Here at Allied Cooperative, we are keeping our inventories low so we don’t have to carry bushels into the future where the price is eroding. Feel free to call me if you need help sorting it out.

– Rich Dahlke, Grain Merchandiser

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Armyworm damage found today! Watch your fields!

Armyworms found today north of Adams near Coloma. Please check your fields for this pest, they will move FAST with this heat. Let us know if you need any help checking your fields. If you are seeing more than 8% damage I would encourage you to spray an insecticide such as Arctic at 6 oz per acre ASAP. Contact us for more details!

– Rob Shields, Agronomist

Army worm damage #2  6-25-13

Army worm feeding 6-25-13

Choosing the right fertigation recipe

Irrigation at BG 6-21-13 #2A lot of our irrigated fields are now receiving crop nutrients through the center pivot irrigation systems. Selecting the correct recipe is determined by many factors, crop present, yield goals, and plant tissue analysis. Pulling the tissue sample 3 to 4 days prior to fertigation is critical. This way the recipe can better reflect what the plants actually need at that stage. You can apply many things through your center pivots, such as Macro Nutrients (N, P, K), Secondary Nutrients (Ca, S), Micro-Nutrients (B, Mn, Zn, Cu, Fe) and plant hormones. Another option you can look at when fertigating is some of the products from Stoller. Two in particular to consider would be Bioforage and Stimulate. When you have shallow-rooted or poor root systems in general, an approved application of these two products can encourage a more aggressive root system. Please contact one of the agronomists at Allied Cooperative for further information on a recipe that is appropriate for your crop.

– Rob Shields, Agronomist

Stressed, stunted, and uneven corn found throughout our trade area…

Yesterday, I looked at some fields near our Melrose and Galesville locations and saw patterns of stressed, stunted, and uneven corn. These patterns have been seen all across our trade area, especially in medium to fine textured soils. It appears these patterns have shown up in our fields for a number of reasons. The primary culprit is the weather conditions we have gone through. The pounding rains have helped to compact these soils and reduce or eliminate the amount of oxygen present in the profile. Combine this with cool, cloudy and wet conditions and you can see the results. Areas of the field that have tighter soils from either the type of soil present or traffic patterns show the stunted symptoms much easier. If you can cultivate, that would help break up these tight soils and allow some air movement to occur. If cultivation is not an option, please try to reduce the stress on the plant wherever possible by keeping the field weed free (use a residual herbicide whenever possible); maintaining adequate fertility (confirm with tissue analysis); reducing the possibility of diseases (consider a foliar fungicide); and monitoring nematode pressure. Please let us know if you diagnose any issues you are seeing in your fields.

Stunted corn near Galesville.

Stunted corn near Galesville.

Stunted corn near Melrose.

Stunted corn near Melrose.

Stunted corn near Melrose.

Stunted corn near Melrose.

– Rob Shields, Agronomist

Insects attacking our alfalfa fields!

We scouted a lot of our producers’ alfalfa fields today. Second crop is well on its way and we are finding some insect pests. The potato leafhopper is one of the most damaging pest to alfalfa in Wisconsin. I looked at a number of fields today that will need to get treated very soon to take care of this troublesome pest. Also with first crop off, now is a very good time to topdress second crop with a mixture of Potash, K-Mag and Boron. Please get a hold of us for a recipe that will best fit your fields.

Potato Leafhoppers found today.

Potato Leafhoppers found today.

Rob Shields scouting alfalfa.

Rob Shields scouting alfalfa.

– Rob Shields, Agronomist

Crop Management Field Day sponsored by Allied Cooperative

Joe Lauer speaks at the Galesville UWEX event.

Joe Lauer speaks at the Galesville UWEX event.

This past Wednesday, June 12th, Allied Cooperative sponsored the Crop Management Field Day at the Ron Weltzein Farm, just south of Galesville, WI. UW specialists went over many important topics, such as insurance issues with prevent plant, selecting the right maturity for your corn, soybean considerations, herbicide issues, fertility management, and insect control options. In attendance from Allied Cooperative were local sales agronomist Nathan Ausen, agronomist Rob Shields, and intern O’Bryan Decker.

– Rob Shields, Agronomist

Surprisingly Bearish USDA Report

We here at Allied Cooperative are excited to welcome our Grain Division to Breaking Ground, and we look forward to hearing more from our grain experts in the future!

The biggest surprise in the USDA supply/demand revisions report (World Agricultural Supply Demand Estimate) that came out Wednesday was the lack of revision – especially in corn acreage. There were no changes to the planted acres. I’m sure you and I both think they should have cut planted acreage. However, the last three times the USDA cut the planted acres in the June report, they were forced to make upward revisions several weeks after. This may be what convinced them to just leave it alone despite the obvious and historically slow planting pace this spring.

The net impact of the report was a slight reduction of 2013/2014 ending stocks of 55 million bu to 1.949 billion bu. That’s how many bushels no one wants and that’s still a large number. It’s the biggest since 2005/2006. We may not like to hear it, but if improving crop conditions are seen, new crop prices could still work lower. December $5.50 futures should be seen as a selling opportunity. Let’s put our focus on the weather and the acreage report which will be out in several weeks to see how much the USDA cuts corn acreage. Remember, it will take a significant reduction in acres to bring down this burdensome carry out – especially if crop conditions improve.

– Rich Dahlke, Grain Merchandiser